Porsche’s new aerodynamic 911 GT3 RS has a massive spoiler that uses the wind for more power

If you want to understand the story of the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS, just look at the wing – and where else would you really look?

The latest 911 has been rumored to have a 4.2-liter mill, the same displacement as the brutal GT3 R race car, but Porsche says the larger engine won’t meet emissions standards. So, to solve how to build a better sports car without boosting its power, the German brand leaned in the wind.

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From here we’re pointing out that the 518 hp 4-liter V6 isn’t sluggish, with a stunning 9000-rpm redline and six individual throttle bodies – inherited from the GT3 – that deliver sharp, pleasant response from the right pedal. But it is an evolution of an already existing engine, while the car’s downforce numbers compared to its predecessor may also be from a completely different machine.

At 124 mph it produces twice the downforce of the previous car, and at 177 mph it has the Clydesdale equivalent (1,895 lbs) sitting atop its carbon-fiber roof.

But while the downforce is great for grip, it deprives the car of straight-line speed. To solve this problem, the automaker designed a Reducing Drag System (DRS) to enable the most aerodynamic slip out of corners automatically by evaluating an array of parameters — including G-forces, steering angle and suspension pressure — and adjusting a portion of the rear spoiler for versatility accordingly. Two banks under the nose work in tandem with the tail configuration to maintain the level of air pressure across the vehicle, eliminating the effect of swaying. DRS systems are an integral part of modern Formula 1 cars, and it’s a great trick to play Lewis Hamilton with a flick of your left thumb, and ditch the rear pull to get past slow traffic.

Porsche 911 GT3 RS on the right track

At 177 mph, the Porsche 911 GT3 RS generates 1,895 pounds of downforce.

A host of other components, from a single radiator up front to roof fins designed to keep warm air flowing away from the engine inlet, take advantage of every ounce of speed and sporty performance from an already sophisticated platform — though managing these variables is serious work: Discs on the steering wheel control everything from the behavior of the rear differential to the compression and rebound settings of the front and rear suspension. Combined, the result is heroic levels of grip – clearly, in fact, more so than the current generation GT3.

During a wet session at Silverstone, in the UK, the head coach unceremoniously rolled that car into the gravel even as the GT3 RS showed great grip, aided in no small part by Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres.

However, while the GT3 RS’s wider stance and aggressive aerodynamics lend it an air of rock-solid stability at higher speeds, slower cornering exposes the usual weaknesses that arise from slick surfaces and cooler temperatures – namely the tendency to wobble at the hips when you depress the pedal. fuel. Get out of turns. But the car is reassuringly adept at cleaning speed, reversing with the DRS and turning on the air brakes to pull the car back to a standstill. It’s road racing technology of the highest standard, and that’s a reminder that, despite the visual drama, the car’s irresistible driving prowess comes not from brute power (the twin-turbo Porsche GT2 RS packs another 182 hp) but the piercing to bend the air to her will.

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