Echo Diana with flowers scattered on lime: The Queen’s funeral evoked memories of 25 years ago

About 17 months after her widowhood, the Queen’s last trip was to rest at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle, to lie down with her beloved husband Philip.

But she wasn’t alone as her coffin made the journey from London on state appeal, as tens of thousands of mourners lined the 25-mile route from Wellington Arch to Berkshire to pay their last respects to the late monarch.

As the Queen’s Eagle soared, flowers were thrown into the path by members of the audience watching from behind the parapets – something that continued almost all the way to Windsor. When the vine arrived, it was covered with stems.

The photos brought back memories of Princess Diana’s funeral 25 years ago. The car carrying her coffin from London arrived at her resting place in Althorp, Northamptonshire, covered in roses.

Yesterday, mourners stood on poles, railings, and camping chairs, and sat on each other’s shoulders to watch the body pass.

When the Eagle Queen took off, members of the audience threw flowers on the way from behind the barricades. When the vine arrived, it was covered with stems (on the right). The photos brought back memories of Princess Diana’s funeral 25 years ago (left)

Enid Reed, 80, and her daughter Elaine Reed, 43, who live in Morecambe, Lancashire, waited patiently to see the Queen’s coffin.

She saw Lady Read, who has been alive throughout the Queen’s reign, for the first time when she was six when Princess Elizabeth was heading towards Horseguards Parade in London.

The crowd pushed me forward because I was only young so I took a good look at it. I saw her again when I was 15 at St Auburn’s Cathedral and again in Aberdeen in 1997. She was so beautiful and she was a good example because she represented kindness and compassion and it would make us proud to know that she represented the country.

Accountant Adam Gibbow, 46, of Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, traveled with his wife, NHS worker Aisha, 42, and their three children early yesterday morning and were standing opposite the Cavalry Regiment home building near Hyde Park at 8am.

Mr. Djibo said: “The Queen has always been a constant presence in our lives and a true role model that we must look forward to. I am 46 and even for my parents, she has always been there as a figurative symbol of Britain, representing many different generations and communities.

Retired intensive care nurses Bobby Moth, 57, and Paula Reynolds, 55, traveled from Portsmouth Sunday night to pay their respects near Hyde Park Corner.

Watch tens of thousands of mourners watch The Queen's sarcophagus traveled 25 miles from Wellington Arch in London to Windsor Castle, where the Queen is buried next to her beloved husband.

Watch tens of thousands of mourners watch The Queen’s sarcophagus traveled 25 miles from Wellington Arch in London to Windsor Castle, where the Queen is buried next to her beloved husband.

Ms. Moth spent 21 years in the Navy and served in Afghanistan in 2006, while Ms. Reynolds served 14 years in the Army, including a tour of Iraq in 1991.

Ms Moth said: “We have both served for a long time so we felt that connection and that it was right that we came to pay our respects.

“I’m only small, so it was hard to find somewhere I could see – I just sat myself on that sidewalk for a few extra inches.”

The daunting task of guarding the funeral procession faced by thousands of police and military officers resulted in a large number of them falling in service. Three military personnel had to be assisted by their colleagues near Wellington Arch shortly before 2 pm.

Farmers have set up a touching honor guard to pay tribute to the queen on her way to her final resting place. More than 30 tractors – some decorated with flowers – lined the A308 motorway as the coffin passed by the Magna Carta memorial at Runnymede.

Mourners stood on poles, railings, and camping chairs and sat on each other's shoulders to watch the cup pass by

Mourners stood on poles, railings, and camping chairs and sat on each other’s shoulders to watch the chair pass by

Colin Rayner, former mayor of Windsor, said they were inspired by the gesture after Scottish farmers set up a similar guard when the Queen left Balmoral Castle last week. “We local farmers bid farewell to another local farmer and a very good neighbor who happens to be Her Majesty the Queen,” said Rainer, 64.

Instead of taking the motorway to Windsor Castle, chairs followed Route A, allowing tens of thousands of well-wishers to choose a spot along the way.

Thousands of mourners streamed through Windsor and Eaton to line the Long Walk to Windsor Castle. Ann Cooper, of Aylesbury, described the ambiance as “quiet”.

Miss Cooper said, “She has been the Queen all my life.” It’s just a really big part of the country.

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